Morning mist, HuangshanGranite spires looming out of the mist, steep winding stone paths, twisted endemic pines lead the contemplative photographer to images the classical painters may have seen.

The Contemplative Landscape in Huangshan:

Synthesizing photography and traditional Chinese landscape painting

George DeWolfe and Lydia Goetze

 

     Lydia Goetze and George DeWolfe have brought the structure of the ancient Chinese painters to life in modern digital photography. The teaching of that structure and practice is now being taught in this new and unique workshop.

     The ancient Chinese painters created an art that has lasted over two millennia, the oldest art genre in the world. It possesses amazing resilience to overcome the arbitrary movements that plague Western art, including photography. Chinese landscape painting represents and unifies the human spirit, nature, and the universe. Created with awareness and reflection, these landscapes are where art and spirit fuse.

     The synthesis of awareness, visual and technical skills brought about by studying the structure of both Chinese landscape painting and contemporary photography in this workshop provides photographers a new way to experience image making. Lydia and George take photographers on a journey, both spiritual and structural, through the maze of differences and similarities of both mediums and teach participants the skills they need to practice the ancient art of Chinese landscape in a modern medium.

     The granite spires of Huangshan are where the Chinese landscape painters found their inspiration. They have walked Huangshan’s paths for over 15 centuries and have built a tradition of painting still practiced today. Huangshan is Yosemite’s sister park in China and is breathtakingly beautiful. Join us for this intellectually and artistically renewing experience.

Not currently scheduled.  For more information:  email lbgoetze@roadrunner.com  

 

To read more about the visual structure of classical Chinese landscape painting and how to apply it to photography, see this article in Luminous Landscape:  http://www.luminous-landscape.com/the_synthesis_of_chinese_landscape_painting_and_photography.shtml